a full, mellow glow

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From The Calm Center by Steve Taylor

Why fight against the fading glow of youth?
Why try to freeze a process that can’t be stopped?
You’re clinging too hard, that’s why you’re weary;
your face is lined with tension not with age.

And even if your form has altered a little
even if the surface is a little worn and chaffed
your being is rich and deep
nourished by experience and understanding
and another kind of light is shining from you now:
a full, mellow glow, like autumn sunshine,
that spreads further and touches deeper
than the flashing, dazzling glow of youth.

Why not let that glow shine through
instead of trying to rekindle a faded light?

Change brings decay if you resist it.
But if you accept it and flow with it,
it brings growth and renewal.

I first read this passage from Steve Taylor’s book The Calm Center on the Find Your Middle Ground blog (The Mellow Glow). Val always shares inspiring, soothing, comforting, delicious words and images that make me feel alive and free.

 

* I took the photo in my backyard of a columbine leaf, just after a spring rain when the sun started coming out (edited with Zeke filter). Here’s another photo of the same plant, same filter.

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Born

firepit

Born

Let the fire burn
Let the flames devour the debris
Let the heat enable seeds to open
Let the ash make fertile soil for growth

This little poem was inspired by a story I read about sequoia trees, the oldest known trees, probably 3500 years old. I read that a key to their longevity is fire because it clears the space so the existing trees can thrive, and its heat opens and releases seeds for the next generation to grow.

I thought about how this kind of transformation happens in the workplace. When those with years of experience move on, space is created for their own and young professionals’ growth.

* I took this photo of a fire burning in our backyard fire pit in the spring.

think of a flower

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Being
Unknown

Think of a flower,
growing in the ground.
Think of the roots that anchor it,
that bring up nourishment.
Think of how it grows
without a thought of serving others.
It does not worry of tomorrow.
It does not think of yesterday.

It does not compare itself
to the other flowers,
to the grass,
to the sunshine, or
to the animals that share its earth.
It simply grows
with great dignity and power,
in its own way, at its own pace.

It blossoms for itself,
and yet the beauty that it brings
contributes to the great beauty of the whole planet.
It can be enjoyed by many
or seen by none,
and this does not diminish its beauty,
or its power,
or its strength.

And when it finishes its cycle,
it dries and withers.
Still there is no fear.
There is no worry.
There is no regret.
And in no time,
it begins the upward progress again
to a new blossom.

This week I received this beautiful poem from my new friend, Maria Gonzalez, best-selling author of Mindful Leadership, who recently joined me and my colleagues for the 2nd Annual Mindfulness@IBM Summit on 4/26.  She saw it on the wall of a Hospice facility, next to the Roof Top Garden. It is a beautiful invitation to awareness, awakening, surrender and openness. Among the words, may you find a beautiful seed to flower your day.

If you know the author of this beautiful piece, please let me know!

 

Learn more about Mindfulness@IBM.

* I took this photo on the roadside of a morning run near the J&J Ranch in  Rothbury, Michigan.