breakthrough

Break through

She looks out across the lawn to the garden bed barren after winter’s biting bitterness. “Break through”, she encourages the perennials, imagining their seeds cracking open, green growth sprouting from their dark crustiness at the heart of their being, pushing up through the soil toward the light of the sun, into the warmth of spring, so that she could see them come alive. As if carried on a breeze whispering through the trees, she realizes she is talking to herself. 

already holding hope for spring so tightly…

a full, mellow glow

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From The Calm Center by Steve Taylor

Why fight against the fading glow of youth?
Why try to freeze a process that can’t be stopped?
You’re clinging too hard, that’s why you’re weary;
your face is lined with tension not with age.

And even if your form has altered a little
even if the surface is a little worn and chaffed
your being is rich and deep
nourished by experience and understanding
and another kind of light is shining from you now:
a full, mellow glow, like autumn sunshine,
that spreads further and touches deeper
than the flashing, dazzling glow of youth.

Why not let that glow shine through
instead of trying to rekindle a faded light?

Change brings decay if you resist it.
But if you accept it and flow with it,
it brings growth and renewal.

I first read this passage from Steve Taylor’s book The Calm Center on the Find Your Middle Ground blog (The Mellow Glow). Val always shares inspiring, soothing, comforting, delicious words and images that make me feel alive and free.

 

* I took the photo in my backyard of a columbine leaf, just after a spring rain when the sun started coming out (edited with Zeke filter). Here’s another photo of the same plant, same filter.

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Born

firepit

Born

Let the fire burn
Let the flames devour the debris
Let the heat enable seeds to open
Let the ash make fertile soil for growth

This little poem was inspired by a story I read about sequoia trees, the oldest known trees, probably 3500 years old. I read that a key to their longevity is fire because it clears the space so the existing trees can thrive, and its heat opens and releases seeds for the next generation to grow.

I thought about how this kind of transformation happens in the workplace. When those with years of experience move on, space is created for their own and young professionals’ growth.

* I took this photo of a fire burning in our backyard fire pit in the spring.